The Little Sorrel Morgan

Posted on February 16, 2020 by Jerrilee.
Categories: breed, health, history, military, riding, training.

Stonewall Jackson’s Little Sorrel Morgan Horse


reprint from Horseandman.com

As the story goes, in 1861 Stonewall Jackson needed a horse in Harper’s Ferry just about the time that a cargo train was seized there that happened to be carrying a load of domestic horses. Fancy that…
The horses were offloaded and led to water where they were observed.
Now, just about everyone said that Thomas Jackson was not the best horseman. So, it stands to reason that he would pick the unruly, fussy, huge and beautiful black STALLION for himself to ride and the sweet little sorrel Morgan gelding for his wife.
After about a day, he ditched the stallion and kept the sorrel for himself.
Legend has it that this little sorrel Morgan was about 15 hands of solid confidence. They say that horse rode into more battles than any other war horse.
And, since Jackson rarely stopped long enough to rest, many soldiers claimed that he slept atop Little Sorrel while he led himself back to camp.
Luckily, Little Sorrel had beautiful gaits and was of the attitude to take care of his rider. (I love Morgans.) And, he had the stamina to boot! Records show that not only did the gelding charge into untold numbers of battle, he often covered over 40 miles in a day. Troops said they never, ever saw fatigue in that horse. Wow!
Not only was he brave, but he was full of personality… Troopers reported that Little Sorrel would lay down on the picket line and receive apples fed to him by the men.
After surviving the war, the gelding was described as a rascal with a mouth that could undo latches, let down bars and liberate every horse in the barn. And like his earlier master, he would lead his command into new fields of opportunity, removing fence rails whenever he wanted.
Jackson was of the opinion that his faith dictated when he would die. Since he believed his death was ordained to happen exactly as God had planned, he never worried about going into battle. When it was his time to meet his maker, he would die then – and not before.
This bravado spread amongst his men which is why they were known as kinda crazy and daredevily. The name “Stonewall” came about because Jackson stonewalled his fears.
That battle chutzpah went for Jackson’s non-churcghoing horse, too. So, I guess Little Sorrel believed what he was told and went wherever his owner asked him to go. A perfect match.
And actually, Little Sorrel was safe. It was Jackson who was shot off of his back by his own men, on accident…
[commentary–Jackson died on May 10, 1863, at a field hospital near Guiney Station, VA, approximately 30 miles from the battlefield at Chancellorsville. Little Sorrel ran off shortly after Jackson was wounded during Chancellorsville, and he was recaptured several days later. He was later returned to Mary Anna, and she eventually sent the horse to the Virginia Military Institute. Little Sorrel ended up spending his final days at the Confederate Soldiers Home in Richmond, as a pet of the veterans who also lived there. He died in 1886 at the age of thirty-six. His hide was preserved, and is on display at the Virginia Military Institute Museum. Little Sorrel’s cremated bones are interred on the parade ground at the Virginia Military Institute.]

Dr Stephen O’Grady:Flexor Tendon Flaccidity

Posted on February 13, 2020 by Jerrilee.
Categories: breed, handicap, health, hoofcare, therapy.

tendons

Flexor tendon flaccidity or tendon laxity is a relatively common limb deformity seen in newborn foals usually involving the hind limbs although all four limbs can be involved. Weak flexor tendons is thought to be the cause which results in digital hyperextension where weight-bearing is placed on the palmar/plantar aspect of the proximal phalanges and the toe of the hoof is raised off the ground. The condition often tends to self-correct within days after birth as the foal gains strength and is allowed moderate exercise. However the tendon laxity often persists and it is not uncommon to see a fool that still has digital hyper-extension at 4 weeks of age.

Treatment is sequential depending on the severity of the tendon laxity and the response of the foal to treatment. Therapy begins with controlled exercise allowing the foal access to a small area with firm footing for 1 hour three times daily, the toe of the foot can be shortened and the heels can be rasped gently from the middle of the foot palmarly/plantarly to create ground surface and a palmar/plantar extension can be applied if necessary. This extension which extends approximately 3-4 centimeters beyond the bulbs of the heels immediately relieves the biomechanical instability. A cuff-type extension shoe is commercially available or a small aluminum plate extension with clips. In either case, the author feels that either type of extension should be attached with adhesive tape rather than a composite if the foal is less than 3 weeks of age as this avoids excessive heat being applied to the fragile hoof capsule as the composite cures and prevents contracture of the hoof capsule at the heels. Regardless of the method of application, the extensions should be changed at 10 day intervals. Bandaging the limb is contraindicated as this will further weaken the flexor tendons.

Photo: uncorrected adult legs in 7 year old mare

Angular limb and deformities are common limb abnormalities in foals that require early recognition and treatment. The pathogenesis of this problem is not clearly understood. Angular limb deformities can be classified as either congenital or acquired in the first few weeks of life. The primary lesion is an imbalance of physeal growth; for various reasons, growth proceeds faster on one side of the physis.

The Conestoga Wagon

Posted on February 8, 2020 by Jerrilee.
Categories: breed, equipment, history.
displayed at the National Museum of American History

displayed at the National Museum of American History

The Conestoga wagon was pretty, painted in a bright Prussian blue with white linen tops and large scarlet wheels. They were huge rigs, capable of hauling up to 6 tons of freight, and they would often travel in trains of up to 30 vehicles. When these huge wagons would travel down the road, there was little room for oncoming traffic, and these wagons did not yield.  These large wagons had no seat for the driver, but rather they often had a special board sticking out on the left side for the driver to stand on. Oncoming traffic would have to veer out to the right to make room for the wagon and its driver.So this is where the American tradition of driving on the right side of the road originated!

During this time, the horses were fitted with harness bells. For the header horses there were small soprano bells and the middle or swing pairs had tenor bells. A bass toned bell was fitted on the right wheelers, but the left wheelers had no bells. If a wagon became stuck, help was available but usually with the payment of one or more bell. The bells became important trophies of skill and success for the teamsters. Thus the expression “to be there with bells on” was born!

The Conestoga wagons were a larger version of what became known as the “prairie schooner” used to transport settlers in the 1800’s. The design of the wagon was reduced between 1820 and 1830, modified for family travel rather than heavy commercial hauling. These wagons were traditionally painted in subdued browns and greens, and thus was born the prairie schooners that made their way west.

from Animal-World Newsletter
editor’s note: for March we have the cross Canada chuck wagon tour of Pierre Cloutier on Equi-Tv!

equi-works

equi-works